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Humid & unstable winds are triggering showers & storms across the northern tropics, WA's interior and southern SA. Gusty & moist onshore winds in the east are driving showers over northeastern NSW & southeast Qld. High pressure keeps the remainder of the country mostly dry.

Now

Min

Max

Mostly SunnySydneyNSW

23.9°C

17°C
26°C

Increasing SunshineMelbourneVIC

27.1°C

11°C
31°C

Heavy ShowersBrisbaneQLD

23.3°C

22°C
28°C

Mostly SunnyPerthWA

23.2°C

17°C
31°C

SunnyAdelaideSA

30.5°C

19°C
34°C

Mostly SunnyCanberraACT

20.2°C

9°C
28°C

Mostly CloudyHobartTAS

20.2°C

9°C
24°C

Possible ThunderstormDarwinNT

30.3°C

26°C
32°C

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Weather in Business


Latest News


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04 Mar 2024, 3:54AM UTC

Wet season arriving in WA this week

Rain and thunderstorms will replace extreme heat over large areas of WA this week, with some places in the state’s north likely to see enough rain to officially mark the start of the wet season. In Australia, the northern wet season is defined as the date after September 1 when at least 50 mm of rain has accumulated. This amount of rain is generally enough to stimulate plant growth after the dry season in northern Australia. The map below shows that the 2023-24 northern rainfall onset occurred between September and December for large areas of Qld, the NT and the Kimberley in WA. However, as of late February, the wet season was yet to begin over parts of northwestern Australia. Image: Northern rainfall onset date observations for the 2023-24 wet season, as of February 27, 2024. Source: Bureau of Meteorology While the 2023-24 wet season arrived early for some areas further east, many northern and interior areas of WA have been locked in a pattern of unusually dry and extremely hot weather since the start of this year. At the end of February, Porth Hedland had only received 25 mm of rain since the start of September, which is half of what it needs to kick off the wet season. In an average wet season, Port Hedland usually reaches 50 mm of accumulated rainfall by late-January. Image: Port Hedland’s wet season rainfall to date, compared to its long-term wet season average. WA just registered its hottest summer on record, with a mean temperature that was 1.90C above the 1961-1990 average. More locally, Carnarvon’s 49.9ºC towards the end of the season was the 2nd highest temperature ever recorded in Australia during February. This came as Perth registered seven days over 40ºC during February, the city’s most 40ºC days on record in a single calendar month. This run of intense heat is finally coming to an end, with cloud starting to build over WA as tropical moisture feeds into a series of low pressure troughs. Importantly, these rain-bearing troughs are expected to linger over the north and interior of WA for most at least a week thanks to blocking high pressure systems near southeastern Australia. This should help kick off the wet season in some areas of northern Australia. Image: Forecast accumulated rain this week, according to the ECMWF-HRES model. This week’s rain and storms will erode the hot air mass that has plagued WA for the last few months. The maps below show the daily maximum temperature forecasts from mid-February and on Thursday this week, highlighting the contrast in maximum temperatures. Images: Maximum temperature forecasts for February 18 (top) and March 7 (bottom), according to the ECMWF-HRES model. While the cooler temperatures and wet weather are likely to be welcomed with open arms by many across WA this week, the rain will be heavy enough to cause flooding in some areas. A flood watch has been issued for the state’s Salt Lake District and Nullarbor District Rivers and Sandy Desert, warning that significant river, creek, and stream rises are likely with heavy rainfall, with flooding and overland inundation possible. Be sure to check the latest flood watches and warnings across WA over the next few weeks.

04 Mar 2024, 12:44AM UTC

First strong burst of autumn weather

It only affected Tasmania and parts of the southeast mainland, but the first cold outbreak of autumn surged northwards from Antarctic waters overnight, reminding us that the seasons are changing. Tassie temps dipped below zero at several locations, including –1.8°C at kunanyi/Mt Wellington above Hobart just before midnight, while Devonport's low of 3.8°C was the coldest it's been this early in the year since 2003. There were also some very light snowfalls at upper elevations in Tasmania. Strong winds also accompanied the cold front, with sustained wind speeds exceeding 100 km/h at Maatsuyker Island off southern Tas, with several gusts topping 130 km/h. Gusts also topped 130 km/h at kunanyi/Mt Wellington, while Hobart itself saw a gust of 95 km/h at 9:42 am. Subzero readings were also registered in the Victorian Alps at Mt Hotham (–1.4°C on Monday morning) while even Cooma Airport in NSW, east of the Snowy Mountains, fell to just 1°C. You can see the surge of cold air at 11 pm Sunday represented by the blue blob on the chart above, while on the loop below, you can see the tell-tale mass of speckled cloud indicating a cold airmass moving across the Tasman Sea to New Zealand. Indeed, New Zealand is in for a burst of snowy early autumn weather, with snow expected to fall as low as 800 metres above sea level on parts of the South Island from 11 pm Monday into Tuesday morning. The cold outburst will be a relief to many Tasmanians after a much warmer than usual summer when mean temperatures were 1.17°C above the long-term average, making it the state's 9th-warmest summer on record while Australia as a whole saw its 3rd-warmest summer on record. Image: It was warmer almost everywhere in summer 2023/24, including across all of Tasmania. Source: BoM.  Conditions are already beginning to ease across our island state, with winds slowly moderating and temps set to rise quite rapidly after a cool Monday. After a spell of weather with top temps in the mid-20s for much of the working week, Hobart could reach 33°C by Saturday. The city's hottest March day on record was 39.1°C on March 2, 2019.

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03 Mar 2024, 2:02AM UTC

Chunky surf on the way for New South Wales

Large groundswell will move into the New South Wales and southeast Queensland coasts on Monday and Tuesday.  A deep low pressure system in the Southern Ocean to the south of Tasmania is moving into the Tasman Sea swell window. Seas to the southeast of Tasmania will reach heights of 10-12m, with most of this energy heading north towards New South Wales and southeast Queensland, but also towards New Zealand and south Pacific islands like Fiji. Image loop: Satellite imagery looped capturing this impressive low spinning in the Southern Ocean on Saturday March 2nd (above) and Sunday March 3rd (below), generating storm force winds and large seas.  A front extending from this low will bring a strengthening southerly wind change to parts of the New South Wales coast on Sunday afternoon and evening, reaching northern New South Wales and southeast Queensland on Monday. Wave heights will increase rapidly behind this change, reaching 3 to 3.5m. The real energy behind this powerful low will, however, quickly build over New South Wales from late Monday morning, reaching southeast Queensland by early Tuesday morning.  Long period groundswell reaching 14-16 seconds is expected for much of New South Wales, possibly stretching to 15-18 seconds further north, at the peak of this swell. Coasts exposed directly to this energy will be treacherous, with huge amounts of water and energy flowing into the coastline. Sudden, very large waves and powerful surges of water will make for dangerous conditions across rock platforms and beaches. Longer period swells carry much more energy than equivalent-height, shorter period swells, leading to sudden large movements of water, either across sudden powerful rip currents, and/or into the beaches or rock shelves.  Image: A schematic showing how longer period swells carry more energy (at a greater depth) than shorter period swell.  The acute southerly direction of this large surf event will mean that north-facing coastlines and coastlines protected by points or headlands to the south will be smaller, but still sudden surges in energy are expected to move in and out of these more sheltered locations.  The large swell will gradually ease on Tuesday, but swell height should still be around 2m on Wednesday, with wave period slowly reducing to about 12-14 seconds into the middle of the week. Beach conditions will be deceiving until Wednesday or Thursday, as seemingly calm seas will be intermittently interrupted by large and powerful waves. A hazardous surf warning is currently out for all coasts of New South Wales, stretching between the Eden and Byron coasts. Please refer to the latest warning here: https://www.weatherzone.com.au/warnings 

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Weather in Business


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31 Jan 2024, 5:54AM UTC

Powerful waves to impact port operations

Deceptively powerful surf is forecast for this weekend, as heavy waves originating from the Southern Ocean hit the NSW coastline. The heavy surf will be whipped up by a low-pressure system sweeping across the south of the continent later this week.  The map below shows wave heights of 3-4m are expected across the central and southern NSW coast on Friday and Saturday.  Image: Significant wave height forecast at 5pm Saturday, February 3 according to Wave Watch III  In Sydney waters, wave heights are forecast to peak at 4 to 4.5 metres on the weekend. These wave heights will create very rough seas off the Sydney and Illawarra coasts on the weekend.   While the waves will be large, it's the wave period that will generate the deceptively powerful surf.  Wave period is the average time between crests (or troughs) of waves. The larger the time difference, the greater the amount of energy associated with the waves or swells.  The wave period should reach 10-12 seconds along the Sydney coast and south on Saturday.  The map below shows the high period waves impacting the central and southern coastline on Saturday.    Image: Wind wave period at 4pm on Saturday, February 3, according to Wave Watch III  Looking ahead, the long period swell should move offshore by Monday easing conditions along the NSW coastline. Weatherzone Business offers a comprehensive suite of services, refined through years of collaboration with the marine, ports and offshore industries, to optimise the safety and efficiency of your operations. For more information, please contact us at business@weatherzone.com.au.

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04 Jan 2024, 4:03AM UTC

Why did electricity demand hit a record low?

On the closing day of 2023, rooftop solar boomed in SA and Vic while record low energy demand was recorded in the two states.   On Sunday, December 31, mild temperatures and sunny skies were behind the new record low energy demand in SA and Vic.  The satellite image below shows the clear skies on Sunday across Australia's southeast mainland, which allowed rooftop solar output to become the leading energy source in SA and Vic.  Image: Himawari-9 satellite image at 1pm AEDT on Sunday, December 31, 2023. Source: RAMMB/CIRA  According to the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO), Victoria’s minimal operational demand was 1,564 MW on Sunday, December 31, which beat the previous record that was set Sunday, November 12, 2023. SA’s demand dropped into the negatives on the same day, reaching as low as -26MW on New Year's Eve, which trumped the previous record low set back in October 2023.  These new records superseded the ones set only several months ago, showing the National Energy Market (NEM) has had a period of abnormally low demand in the past couple of months. This has been driven by cooler temperatures under the influence of a positive phase of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and the waning impact of El Nino in December.  The image below shows that on the same day, rooftop solar (yellow) contributed most of SA and Vic energy needs.   Image: Vic and SA electricity generation on Sunday, December 31, Source Wattclarity  The Image above also shows that wind and solar farms contributed near zero energy demand during the middle of the same day. It also shows that brown coal and rooftop solar were the two main sources of energy for the grid in the middle of the day in the states.   On Sunday, winds were relatively light under the influence of a high-pressure ridge extending from Bight to the southern Tasman Sea.  According to AEMO, rooftop solar contributed two-thirds of VIC's & all of SA's total energy needs on December 31.  New operational demand records set in VIC (1,564 MW) & SA (-26 MW) on 31 December 2023, with #rooftopsolar contributing two-thirds of VIC's & all of SA's total energy needs. On the day, wholesale electricity prices averaged -$66.54 & -$73.02 ($/MWh) in SA & VIC, respectively. pic.twitter.com/0JUorY4wG4 — AEMO (@AEMO_Energy) January 2, 2024 Rooftop solar has been increasing year-on-year since 2018, driven by a boom in solar installations across Australia.   Looking ahead, January looks to be wetter and cloudier than average across much of the NEM. February is expected to see near-to-below average rainfall and cloud, which could increase solar output in the closing month of summer. 

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