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Daily Forecast

Heat is filtering into the southeast, with a brisk cooling wind change moving over VIC and southern SA with a front. Showers and storms over eastern VIC and TAS ahead of the change. Showers and storms across northern Australia, northern SA and NSW.

Now

Min

Max

Mostly SunnySydneyNSW

24.0°C

22°C
35°C

Mostly CloudyMelbourneVIC

21.4°C

19°C
25°C

Late ShowerBrisbaneQLD

24.5°C

22°C
31°C

Mostly CloudyPerthWA

21.2°C

17°C
29°C

Rain ClearingAdelaideSA

20.1°C

24°C
29°C

Mostly CloudyCanberraACT

21.1°C

19°C
34°C

Mostly CloudyHobartTAS

19.6°C

19°C
25°C

Possible ThunderstormDarwinNT

28.1°C

26°C
32°C

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Low Temperature

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Records data is supplied by the Bureau of Meteorology and has not been independently quality controlled.

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Latest News


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Today, 7:28AM UTC

Sydney to soar to 40 on last day of summer

Sydney is set for a scorcher on the last day of summer, with parts of the city's west likely to reach 39°C or 40°C, while the city should reach 35°C before a late cool change arrives. On Wednesday, temperatures topped 43°C in several spots in the Mallee region in Victoria's northwest, while temps reached 44°C in at least two locations in far western New South Wales. That heat has been tracking across southern Australia from west to east for several days, and it will finally reach the east coast on Thursday, with only Sydney's coastal suburbs spared the worst of the heat. Canberra is also in for a reasonably hot one with a top of 34°C expected, which will make Thursday one of the sweatiest days of the 2023/24 summer. The national capital hasn't had a particularly warm summer by its standards, with a hottest day to date of 34.8°C on December 9. Rain tends to keep a lid on extreme daytime temperatures, and as you can see on the graph below, Canberra has indeed had a wet summer. As of Wednesday evening, the bushfire danger for Thursday is currently rated as high in about half of New South Wales, but it will pay to keep checking the latest info at the Rural Fire Service website. You can also check the latest warnings on the Weatherzone warnings page.

Today, 3:46AM UTC

Catastrophic fire danger observed in western Victoria

A dangerous mixture of hot, dry and windy weather is causing catastrophic fire danger ratings to be observed in parts of western Victoria today. The term ‘catastrophic fire danger’ refers to the highest rating on the Australian Fire Danger Rating System, which has four tiers: Moderate High Extreme Catastrophic Each category corresponds to a range of values in the Fire Behaviour Index (FBI), which is an index that incorporates weather elements like wind and temperature in real time. Catastrophic fire danger occurs when the FBI reaches 100 or above, which represents the most dangerous possible conditions for a fire. If a fire starts under conditions and takes hold in a populated area, lives and homes are likely to be lost. This Wednesday, February 28, 2024, had been identified as a potential day for catastrophic fire danger in parts of western Victoria, due to a combination of very hot, dry and windy weather associated with the passage of a frontal system. While a band of cloud and showers limited heating in parts of western Victoria on Wednesday morning, clearer skies ahead of and behind this cloud band allowed temperatures and fire danger ratings to soar. Image: A total fire ban sign is seen in Beaufort, Victoria, Wednesday, February 28, 2024. (AAP Image/Con Chronis) At 1pm AEDT on Wednesday, temperatures had already reached 40ºC at Swan Hill in the state’s northwest and above 35ºC at Cape Nelson in the southwest. Fire danger ratings had already reached Extreme levels in parts of southwest Victoria and southeastern SA before midday on Wednesday. Then, shortly after 1:30pm AEDT, the FBI tipped over 100 at Hamilton, Casterton and Kanangulk, representing catastrophic fire danger. Image: Observed FBI values at 1:35pm AEDT on Wednesday. February 28, 2024. Fire danger  Fire danger will fluctuate throughout the remainder of Wednesday with ebbs and flows in wind, temperature and humidity. In general, fire danger will remain elevated in parts of western Vic and adjacent areas of SA and southwest NSW into Wednesday afternoon and evening, before reducing overnight and into Thursday. Any fires that start in western Vic, eastern SA and southwest NSW on Wednesday will be very dangerous and difficult to control. Be sure to stay up to date with the latest information on current fires in each state by visiting these pages: Vic - Country Fire Authority, Victoria SA - SA Country Fire Service NSW - NSW Rural Fire Service

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27 Feb 2024, 10:59PM UTC

Total fire bans in Melbourne, most of Victoria

The day of extremely dangerous fire weather which has been on the cards all week has arrived in Victoria, with total fire bans declared in six of the state's nine forecast districts. The CFA map below shows the districts where the bans are in place, with only the state's east and northeast, including the High Country, exempt from a total fire ban. The CFA has a page where you can check what you can and can't do on days of total fire ban, which you can read here. The short version is don't light any sort of fire and be extremely careful if you are working outdoors with machinery. Source: CFA. The Australian Fire Danger Rating System was unified across all states and territories a couple of years ago, and the four ratings used nationally are: Moderate, High, Extreme, Catastrophic. Fire danger is extreme in five Victorian districts this Wednesday and catastrophic in the parched Wimmera district. There are five main factors fuelling today's ratings: The first is the ongoing dry spell in the second half of the summer which has left the country tinder dry over the western half of Victoria. No rain, or less than one millimetre of rainfall in total, has been recorded in many districts, especially in the state’s central and western districts. Secondly, it will be hot in Victoria today, with temperatures reaching the mid-thirties in Melbourne and around 44°C in Mildura in the state's far northwest corner. Thirdly, there will be gusty northwesterly winds. Melbourne Airport had already reported a gust of 56 km/h just after 9 am. Fourthly, a gusty southwesterly change later in the day will drop temps but there will be only small amounts of moisture with the change, so any fires that have started during the day could shift in direction and intensity, making containment extremely tricky for firefighters. Finally, some thunderstorms may also occur, possibly severe, with the obvious associated danger of fires sparked by dry lightning strikes. Image: The fire near Beaufort, Vic (near Ballarat) earlier this week. Source: @johnfwright and @shmark82 on Instagram. Meanwhile as you'd expect ahead of scorching hot late summer day, there were some pretty uncomfortable overnight minimums. Not all of those will be reflected in the official stats. For example, Adelaide's minimum in the 24 hours to 9 am Wednesday was 24°C just before 8 am. But Adelaide was still almost 35°C at 5 am before the cool change finally arrived, dropping temps by 10 degrees within a couple of hours. That cooler weather will edge its way across Victoria from west to east throughout the day. For a comprehensive wrap of the dangerous weather conditions in Victoria this Wednesday, check Ben Domensino's story. And as ever, please check our warnings page for all the latest info.

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31 Jan 2024, 5:54AM UTC

Powerful waves to impact port operations

Deceptively powerful surf is forecast for this weekend, as heavy waves originating from the Southern Ocean hit the NSW coastline. The heavy surf will be whipped up by a low-pressure system sweeping across the south of the continent later this week.  The map below shows wave heights of 3-4m are expected across the central and southern NSW coast on Friday and Saturday.  Image: Significant wave height forecast at 5pm Saturday, February 3 according to Wave Watch III  In Sydney waters, wave heights are forecast to peak at 4 to 4.5 metres on the weekend. These wave heights will create very rough seas off the Sydney and Illawarra coasts on the weekend.   While the waves will be large, it's the wave period that will generate the deceptively powerful surf.  Wave period is the average time between crests (or troughs) of waves. The larger the time difference, the greater the amount of energy associated with the waves or swells.  The wave period should reach 10-12 seconds along the Sydney coast and south on Saturday.  The map below shows the high period waves impacting the central and southern coastline on Saturday.    Image: Wind wave period at 4pm on Saturday, February 3, according to Wave Watch III  Looking ahead, the long period swell should move offshore by Monday easing conditions along the NSW coastline. Weatherzone Business offers a comprehensive suite of services, refined through years of collaboration with the marine, ports and offshore industries, to optimise the safety and efficiency of your operations. For more information, please contact us at business@weatherzone.com.au.

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04 Jan 2024, 4:03AM UTC

Why did electricity demand hit a record low?

On the closing day of 2023, rooftop solar boomed in SA and Vic while record low energy demand was recorded in the two states.   On Sunday, December 31, mild temperatures and sunny skies were behind the new record low energy demand in SA and Vic.  The satellite image below shows the clear skies on Sunday across Australia's southeast mainland, which allowed rooftop solar output to become the leading energy source in SA and Vic.  Image: Himawari-9 satellite image at 1pm AEDT on Sunday, December 31, 2023. Source: RAMMB/CIRA  According to the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO), Victoria’s minimal operational demand was 1,564 MW on Sunday, December 31, which beat the previous record that was set Sunday, November 12, 2023. SA’s demand dropped into the negatives on the same day, reaching as low as -26MW on New Year's Eve, which trumped the previous record low set back in October 2023.  These new records superseded the ones set only several months ago, showing the National Energy Market (NEM) has had a period of abnormally low demand in the past couple of months. This has been driven by cooler temperatures under the influence of a positive phase of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and the waning impact of El Nino in December.  The image below shows that on the same day, rooftop solar (yellow) contributed most of SA and Vic energy needs.   Image: Vic and SA electricity generation on Sunday, December 31, Source Wattclarity  The Image above also shows that wind and solar farms contributed near zero energy demand during the middle of the same day. It also shows that brown coal and rooftop solar were the two main sources of energy for the grid in the middle of the day in the states.   On Sunday, winds were relatively light under the influence of a high-pressure ridge extending from Bight to the southern Tasman Sea.  According to AEMO, rooftop solar contributed two-thirds of VIC's & all of SA's total energy needs on December 31.  New operational demand records set in VIC (1,564 MW) & SA (-26 MW) on 31 December 2023, with #rooftopsolar contributing two-thirds of VIC's & all of SA's total energy needs. On the day, wholesale electricity prices averaged -$66.54 & -$73.02 ($/MWh) in SA & VIC, respectively. pic.twitter.com/0JUorY4wG4 — AEMO (@AEMO_Energy) January 2, 2024 Rooftop solar has been increasing year-on-year since 2018, driven by a boom in solar installations across Australia.   Looking ahead, January looks to be wetter and cloudier than average across much of the NEM. February is expected to see near-to-below average rainfall and cloud, which could increase solar output in the closing month of summer. 

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