Weather News

Central Australia's frostiest winter in a decade

Brett Dutschke, Thursday July 19, 2012 - 13:50 EST

Much of central Australia is experiencing an unusually frosty winter, the frostiest in more than a decade in some parts and there's much more to come.

Alice Springs has chilled to zero-degrees-or-below 24 times this winter so far, 12 times more than the winter average. This is the highest number since 2002, when there were 36.

Leigh Creek, in South Australia's far north, has dipped to zero-or-below 10 times so far, the most in at least 30 years. This beats the previous winter record of nine, set in 1997.

A similar story can be told for much of the outback due to very dry air and dominant high pressure systems over the region. The highs have been generating mostly clear and calm weather for long periods, allowing it to get cold on many nights and mornings.

A high pressure system looks like being a feature for at east another week, enabling the development of further frosts almost every morning.

This is making life tough for campers and those getting up for work each morning.

With more than 40 nights of winter to go there's a chance that Alice Springs will get close to its record of 44 freezing nights, set in 1976.

- Weatherzone

© Weatherzone 2012

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