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Alice Springs 256km Radar/Lightning

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Bureau of Meteorology Weather Radar

Lightning Data Upgrade - NEW

Lightning Events

lightning Lightning strikes are displayed as crosses (ground events) or squares (cloud events) and fade from white (current) to red (30 minutes ago) to blue (60 minutes ago).

In December 2014 we upgraded our lightning network to the latest in sensor technology as used by the world's leading meteorological agencies. This has resulted in changes and improvements to the lightning data you will now see. The main changes are:

  • Much better detection of cloud to cloud strikes. Our upgraded network detects more CC strikes and better reflects research that shows typical storm cells produce approximately 75% cloud strikes and 25% ground strikes.
  • We have modified the display to show cloud to cloud strikes in smaller boxes and ground strikes above as "+" symbols. Temporal colouring remains the same.
  • Greater network coverage right across the country.

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About Weatherzone Radar

distance measuring Distance and latitude/longitude coordinates are displayed when you mouse over the map. The origin for distance measuring is indicated by a red dot and defaults to either your location, if specified and in range, or the location of the radar/the centre of the map. The origin may be changed by clicking elsewhere on the map.

The colours and symbols used on the radar and satellite maps are described on our legend page. View legend »

Lightning data supplied by GPATS

Radar Details

Alice Springs Windfinding and Weather Watch Radar
Northern Territory
23.8170°S  133.9000°E  545m AMSL

LocationAlice Springs Airport Radar TypeWF 100 C Band Typical Availability2145-0215; 0345-0815; 0945-1415; 1545-2015

The Alice Springs radar has a very good view to the south of the airport. The coverage is from 260 degrees (True) through the south to 075 degrees (True) - this area includes: Tempe Downs, Angus Downs, Kulgera, Finke and the western edge of the Simpson Desert. The effectiveness of the radar is reduced markedly to the north by the MacDonnell Ranges which lie between the Airport and Alice Springs Central Business District. In the north, the area of good coverage lies from Mt. Hay in the west to Mt. Yambah in the north to Harts Range in the northeast. Due to the relative high cloud base normally associated with shower, storm and rain events, intensities in the low ranges must be considered suspect. In normal circumstances, there is a large amount of dry air beneath the clouds and this causes a certain amount of evaporation of the precipitation. In the 0.0 to 0.2 mm range, most of the precipitation does not reach the ground (virga); in the 0.2 to 2.0 mm range the actual rainfall is generally closer to 1.0 mm mark, however, in the higher ranges, rainfall rates are usually fairly accurate. Being a C Band radar, if there are large thunderstorms around, the radar may not be able to detect accurately the strength of other storms located behind the closest storms. This may also lead to the underestimation of the strength, at times, of very intense isolated storms. Heavy rain over the radar itself will reduce the reliability of the radar in all directions.

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Fewer cyclones than average expected in Australia this season

ABC image 21:43 EDT Australia is likely to experience fewer cyclones than average this season, but the Northern Territory is set for almost an average number, weather forecasters predict.

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