Fairfax Media Network

Weather Warnings - Flood Watch

Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology
Tasmania

Note: This Flood Watch is a "heads up" for possible future flooding and is NOT
a Flood Warning.

FINAL FLOOD WATCH FOR THE HUON RIVER
Issued at 3:57 pm EST on Saturday 12 August 2017

By the Bureau of Meteorology, Hobart.


A flood watch for the Huon River is now finalised.

In the 48 hours to 3pm Saturday, widespread rainfall totals of 20-60mm have
been recorded in the Huon River catchment, with higher totals in excess of 70mm
recorded at North Boomerang. Rain is starting to ease, with further rainfall
totals of 5-10mm likely across the Huon River catchment for the remainder of
Saturday.

River rises have been observed in the upper Huon River. Catchment specific
warnings will be issued if and when required.

Strong and dangerous flows may be a hazard throughout the Huon River catchment
for the next few days.


Note: This Flood Watch is a "heads up" for possible future flooding and is NOT
a Flood Warning. The Bureau of Meteorology does not provide a flood warning
service for all of the catchments covered by this flood watch.

FloodSafe advice is available at www.ses.tas.gov.au
Road closure information is available at www.police.tas.gov.au

For emergency assistance call the SES on telephone number 132 500.
For life threatening situations, call 000 immediately.

Weather Forecast:
For the latest weather forecast see http://www.bom.gov.au/tas/forecasts/

Next Issue:
No further flood watches will be issued for this event.

For the latest rainfall and river level information see
www.bom.gov.au/tas/flood
Display Your Local Weather

Weather News

Ski resorts recovering nicely after early-week snow loss

13:58 EST

Australia's ski resorts will be looking good this weekend despite heavy rain eroding the natural snow base earlier in the week.

The future of snow: why machines will have a bigger role to play

12:47 EST

While a fresh blast of snow blanketed Australia's alpine resorts over the weekend, the season started with much less promise.

How do we keep track of record snowfalls in Australia? It all happens at remote Spencers Creek

12:40 EST

Snow depth measurements taken at a remote location in the Kosciuszko National Park have kept track of the Australian snow seasons and charted record-breaking snowfalls for more than six decades.