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NW Tas 256km Radar/Lightning

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Bureau of Meteorology Weather Radar

About Weatherzone Radar

distance measuring Distance and latitude/longitude coordinates are displayed when you mouse over the map. The origin for distance measuring is indicated by a red dot and defaults to either your location, if specified and in range, or the location of the radar/the centre of the map. The origin may be changed by clicking elsewhere on the map.

The colours and symbols used on the radar and satellite maps are described on our legend page. View legend »

Radar Details

West Takone Weather Watch Radar
Tasmania
41.1810°S  145.5790°E  400m AMSL

LocationLoones Hill, West Takone Radar TypeWSR 81 C Band Typical Availability24 hours

The radar coverage is 360 degrees and encompasses much of Bass Strait, Tasmania's northwest, central north and to a lesser extent, the northeast and the west coast as far south as Strahan. The coverage to the south is limited in range by the Central Plateau. In all this radar has proven to be an invaluable forecasting and monitoring tool. False echoes are sometimes viewed close in from the nearby pine plantations particularly in damp conditions. Anomalous propagation from Bass Strait cause similar echoes. Permanent echo suppression and swept gain characteristics take care of the majority of these.

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Weather News

ANZAC Day forecast

11:33 EST

What will the weather be like for dawn services and ANZAC Day marches in Australia's capital cities? Brisbane will be dry with light winds at dawn and the day should stay rain-free, with only the slight chance of a light shower or two.

Perth rainfall is higher than Melbourne, Hobart, London despite reputation for sunny beaches

10:32 EST

Perth may be best known for its idyllic beaches and sunny skies, but the West Australian capital sees more rain than Melbourne, Hobart and London — cities often associated with gloomy, wet weather.

Corals build 'cloud umbrellas' to help keep cool under blazing sun, study says

10:04 EST

Australian researchers have found corals build "cloud umbrellas" to protect themselves from the scorching sun, and say coral loss through bleaching events could have wider ramifications for weather and agricultural production along the Queensland coast.