Fairfax Media Network

Warrego 256km Radar/Lightning

Satellite Image




  •  
light dBZ scale heavy
Bureau of Meteorology Weather Radar

About Weatherzone Radar

distance measuring Distance and latitude/longitude coordinates are displayed when you mouse over the map. The origin for distance measuring is indicated by a red dot and defaults to either your location, if specified and in range, or the location of the radar/the centre of the map. The origin may be changed by clicking elsewhere on the map.

The colours and symbols used on the radar and satellite maps are described on our legend page. View legend »

Radar Details

Warrego Radar
Queensland
26.4400°S  147.3490°E  535m AMSL

LocationAbout 110km east of Charleville near the Dulbydilla siding Radar TypeTVDR 2500 C-band Typical Availability24 hours

Geographical Situation: The radar is located on the south side of the Warrego Highway about 110 km east of Charleville. The site is on the Great Dividing Range and is near the highest point on the highway between Roma and Charleville. The radar's horizon is only slightly affected by the rising ground of the foothills of the Chesteron Rage to the north and west. In all other directions the land is generally undulating plains gradually sloping down towards the south. The radar's coverage has minor reductions from the west, through north to the north-east due to the foothills of the Chesterton Range. The agricultural land from the west of Charleville to the east of Roma falls within the radar's coverage, as does the area around Carnarvon Gorge to the north and Bollon to the south.

Meteorological Aspects: The radar is well situated to monitor rain bearing weather systems that may affect the catchments and valleys of the Warrego and the Maranoa River basins. Thunderstorms, rain bearing depressions, troughs and fronts will be able to be tracked and the distribution of rainfall produced by these systems can be monitored to provide valuable information for flood and severe weather warnings.

Non-meteorological aspects: In most cases the processing of the radar signal removes permanent echoes caused by obstructions such as hills, buildings and other solid objects. Occasionally, some permanent echoes will not be completely removed from the display. These echoes usually occur as isolated, stationary patches along the Great Dividing Range and other prominent outcrops. These effects usually become more noticeable on cold, clear, winter nights or early winter mornings when cold air lies near the land's surface.

Display Your Local Weather

Weather News

Climate Council warns Queensland will be hard hit by violent storms as the earth warms up

13:30 EDT

The Climate Council has warned that warmer global temperatures could have a severe impact on Queensland with more storm surges and intense cyclone activity likely.

WA flooding continues

12:56 EDT

Record-breaking rain is causing flooding over parts of Western Australia this week, while parched Perth misses out once again.

Heatwave has race car drivers concerned about tyres and road temperatures

11:56 EDT

As temperatures push above 35 degrees along the east coast, what does the extreme heat do to tyres driving on hot, often bubbling roads? Bitumen absorbs the summer heat, often making road surfaces more than 20 degrees hotter than air temperatures.