Fairfax Media Network

Weather News

Weekend begins with a bang in Perth

Mellissa Mackellar, Saturday September 7, 2013 - 12:27 EST

Perth has had a thundery start to the weekend, with an impressive light show and the heaviest rain in years for some places.

A low pressure trough caused thunderstorms to spark up during the early hours of Saturday, with more than 2500 lightning strikes recorded within a 150km radius of Perth between midnight and 8am.

The thundery action really picked up after 4am, bringing isolated heavy falls to some parts. The wettest part of Perth was the airport, where 39mm had landed in the gauge by 9am, making it the heaviest rain since July 2010. Elsewhere, there was 18mm at Bickley and 14mm at Whiteman Park, while the city itself had just 4mm.

As the morning progresses the rumbles of thunder will continue across the city, causing early voters to venture out in raincoats.

By Saturday afternoon, a high pressure ridge will start to build from the west, bringing more stable conditions and making further thunderstorms unlikely. So for late voters a sausage sizzle at the polling booth may still be a go-er.

- Weatherzone

© Weatherzone 2013

More breaking news

Sydney Morning Herald
ABC News
National Nine News
News Limited

Display Your Local Weather

Weather News

ANZAC Day forecast

11:33 EST

What will the weather be like for dawn services and ANZAC Day marches in Australia's capital cities? Brisbane will be dry with light winds at dawn and the day should stay rain-free, with only the slight chance of a light shower or two.

Perth rainfall is higher than Melbourne, Hobart, London despite reputation for sunny beaches

10:32 EST

Perth may be best known for its idyllic beaches and sunny skies, but the West Australian capital sees more rain than Melbourne, Hobart and London — cities often associated with gloomy, wet weather.

Corals build 'cloud umbrellas' to help keep cool under blazing sun, study says

10:04 EST

Australian researchers have found corals build "cloud umbrellas" to protect themselves from the scorching sun, and say coral loss through bleaching events could have wider ramifications for weather and agricultural production along the Queensland coast.