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Melbourne's wettest spring in 17 years

Anthony Duke, Thursday November 25, 2010 - 17:12 EDT

After collecting more than 20mm overnight Melbourne is now having its wettest spring in 17 years. So far, Melbourne has amassed 256mm, last surpassed in 1993 when 259mm was received.

A deep trough moved into Victoria yesterday, which dragged moisture from the tropics generating storms and showers.

Rain was heaviest in western and central regions with a fairly widespread 20 to 30mm. Since 9am on Thursday a further 5 to 15mm has fallen over central parts. There were a few intense bursts of rain, Scoresby picking up 6mm in 10 minutes.

The forecast looks equally wet for central and eastern regions over the weekend as the trough lingers. At this stage, Saturday looks to be the wettest day, with up to a further 5 to 15mm in Melbourne, with more expected north and east of the city. The biggest rain will move east by Sunday.

The rain in the next few days will make it the wettest spring in Melbourne since 1992 when 371mm was collected. The wettest spring on record was in 1916 when 451mm fell.

- Weatherzone

© Weatherzone 2010

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