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Hot start to 2018 for southeastern Australia

Lachlan Maher, Sunday December 31, 2017 - 13:24 EDT

With the New Year rapidly approaching and weather for the celebrations looking mostly good for the southeast of the nation, it might be time to look at how 2018 is set to begin.

While the first few days look to be slightly above average for the southeast, temperatures look set to rise from Thursday 4th as warm air is drawn down ahead of a front. The first hot spell of the year should follow, lasting around four days until it ends on Sunday 7th.

Although the heat that it brings doesn't look to break any records, it still is significantly above average in most major cities, with the peaks expected over the weekend listed below.

Adelaide should reach tops of 42 (14 above average)
Sydney should reach tops of 34 (8 degrees above average)
Bankstown should reach tops of 40 (12 degrees above average)
Melbourne should reach tops of 41 degrees (15 degrees above average)
Canberra should reach tops of 37 (9 degrees above average)

Following these peaks, temperatures should drop back to around average as a cold change comes through late in the weekend. However, it is likely that warm conditions will return after a few days of average temperatures.

- Weatherzone

© Weatherzone 2017

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