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Adelaide disappears into dust, in unseasonal SA heat

Monday September 30, 2013 - 13:27 EST
ABC image
Strengthening northerly winds push dust across Adelaide at sunrise - ABC

Some unseasonal heat is forecast for the end of September across South Australia.

Forecast maximums for the day range from 38 degrees Celsius at Tarcoola, to 34 for Ceduna, 35 at Renmark and 29 in Adelaide.

Weather bureau climatologist Darren Ray said a trend had been evident for the early part of spring.

"For instance in Adelaide the previous record warmest September (average) daytime temperatures was 21.7 in 1944 and we're actually smashing that out of the ballpark with temperatures well in excess of 22 degrees for average daytime temperatures for Adelaide and we're also seeing records for a number of stations right around the state," he said.

Dusty at dawn

Strengthening northerly winds have pushed dust across Adelaide at sunrise, but some showers and a thunderstorm are likely later.



The Country Fire Service (CFS) said it will be a day of significant fire danger for many parts of South Australia.

The official fire danger season is yet to start, so permits are not required to carry out burn-offs of vegetation.

The CFS is urging people to hold off burning until the weather conditions are milder.

During the morning, strong winds forced a suspension of the Jervois-Tailem Bend ferry service across the Murray.


- ABC

© ABC 2013

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