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Sydney 128km Radar/Lightning

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Bureau of Meteorology Weather Radar

About Weatherzone Radar

distance measuring Distance and latitude/longitude coordinates are displayed when you mouse over the map. The origin for distance measuring is indicated by a red dot and defaults to either your location, if specified and in range, or the location of the radar/the centre of the map. The origin may be changed by clicking elsewhere on the map.

The colours and symbols used on the radar and satellite maps are described on our legend page. View legend »

Radar Details

Terrey Hills Weather Watch Radar
New South Wales/ACT
33.7009°S  151.2098°E  194m AMSL

LocationTerrey Hills, NSW Radar TypeMeteor 1500 S-band Doppler Typical Availability24 hours

Geographical Situation: The radar is located 18 km north of the Sydney CBD. The Terrey Hills site, on the Hornsby plateau at an elevation of 195 metres above sea level, gives the radar an excellent view in all directions. The rough topography of the Great Dividing Range slightly compromises the radar's view to the west, but the coverage to the north, east and south is largely unobstructed. Based on detecting echoes at an altitude of 3,000 metres, the radar coverage extends as far north as Bulahdelah and Scone, west to Mudgee and Bathurst and south to Goulburn and Ulladulla.

Meteorological Aspects: The radar will readily detect thunderstorms and deep rain-bearing systems approaching from any direction, often at greater range than quoted above. The high sensitivity of the radar will assist in the detection of drizzle and light shower activity over Sydney, the Central Coast and Blue Mountains, but, as with other radars, the curvature of the Earth may hide these usually shallow weather systems at longer range. People in the Newcastle, Hunter Valley and lower Mid North coast are therefore encouraged to refer to the nearer Newcastle radar, those in the Illawarra the Sydney (Appin) radar and users on the Southern Tablelands the Canberra radar.

Non-meteorological Echoes: In most cases, processing of the radar signal removes permanent echoes caused by hills, buildings and other solid objects, but sometimes a few slip through. These usually show up as small, stationary or erratically moving specks, mostly over the higher ground of the Blue Mountains, Southern Highlands and Barrington Tops areas. On cold clear winter nights and mornings these echoes may become stronger or increase in number due to downward refraction of the radar beam.

Ships are regularly observed over the sea. These appear as specks or short arcs (oriented perpendicular to the direction of the radar). They can often be tracked moving towards or away from port over a series of images.

During strong winds and very rough seas, sea clutter may be visible off the coast out to a range of about 30 km. This sea clutter tends to remain in the same area and can therefore be distinguished from rain echoes, which generally move with the wind.

Display Your Local Weather

Weather News

How Australia survived its second-hottest summer without load-shedding blackouts

18:52 EST

Australia's electricity grid survived the second-hottest summer on record without load-shedding blackouts, despite the closure of a major coal-fired power station in Victoria, according to two reports released on Wednesday by the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO).

Rain deficit worsening in western NSW

16:08 EST

NSW, like most of Australia, has been stuck in a stagnant weather pattern for the last week, with a high pressure system to the south of the country blocking cold fronts from bringing any substantial rainfall.

Quiet weather coming to an end

12:24 EST

The stable weather pattern that has been gripping Australia through the middle of May will soon break down, making way for more active weather across southern states during the final week of autumn.