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Weaving weeds into flood-inspired art

Eliza Rogers, Monday July 14, 2014 - 16:30 EST
ABC image
Weed weaving assistant Yasmin Matahari shows how it's done. - ABC
ABC image
Children have a go at creating a weed umbrella. - ABC

There are many ways to fight weeds, but weaving them into symbolic sculptures is perhaps the most creative.

Families gathered in a busy marketplace in Maryborough in south-east Queensland recently, to make weed umbrellas as part of the 'Afloat Project', which encourages people to express their flood experiences through art.



With the help of the community, Sunshine Coast-based weavers have crafted weeds, including the destructive cat's claw creeper, into umbrellas, boats and eagles to signify the floodwaters that tore through the region last year.

Assistant Yasmin Matahari says the project is not only creative, but environmentally helpful.

"The more we use and try to harvest it [the weeds], it's actually good for the environment."

Head weed sculptor Chris Martin has crafted a large boat in Bundaberg, and coordinated a large eagle head sculpture with a special double meaning.

"After the floods, a lot of eagles came out and they were swirling around the skies so the kids thought this represented courage and strength of the people after the floods," Ms Matahari explained.

Local family Nara, Sam and Harry Warren came along to take part, and said it was a fun way to work with Mother Nature.

"I reckon it's really fun to get kids out there and help," Harry, eight, said.

"It's beautiful, I brought my youngest down to the art museum and he had a go at the weaving and was so excited so we had to come back again today," Nara added. 


- ABC

© ABC 2014

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