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Torrential rains claim nearly 50 lives in India

Sunday October 27, 2013 - 08:45 EDT

Torrential rains have claimed up to 48 lives in eastern India.

It comes in the wake of the worst cyclone to hit the country in over a decade.

The downpour has resulted in rivers spilling their banks in India's eastern coastal states of Orissa and Andhra Pradesh, forcing thousands to flee their homes.

Local media says the rains had killed up to 45 people in Andhra Pradesh and Orissa, with hundreds of villages submerged in nearly 30 districts and road and rail links disrupted.

Tripti Parule, spokeswoman for the National Disaster Management Agency, says some 30 rescue teams, already involved in state-wide relief operations, have been sent to affected areas.

"The administration was already geared up for this situation after cyclone Phailin. The provision of dry food, water packets, medicines... all of it is being taken care of by the states," she said.

Ms Parule says she hopes the flooding will subside in 48 hours.

Phailin, the strongest cyclone to hit India in 14 years, made landfall on October 12 killing at least 22 people.

It pounded the eastern states, bringing winds of more than 200 kilometres an hour, uprooting trees, overturning trucks, snapping power lines and flooding large tracts of farmland.

AFP/ABC


- ABC

© ABC 2013

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