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Top End loses its cool as heat lingers in Dry

Tuesday July 9, 2013 - 16:29 EST
Audience submitted image
The record for the highest July overnight minimum temperature in Darwin was 26.6 degrees Celsius, recorded in 2010. - Audience submitted

While parts of southern Australia shivered overnight, people in the Top End sweltered.

The overnight minimum in Darwin was 25.3 degrees Celsius, well above the cooler temperatures generally experienced during the northern dry season month of July.

But while people resorted to fans and air conditioners to battle the heat while trying to sleep, the night did not break any records, and proved again that Territorians have short memories when it comes to weather.

The highest July overnight minimum temperature in Darwin was 26.6 degrees Celsius, recorded in 2010.

Maximum temperatures of 33 degrees Celsius have been forecast for Darwin over the next two days.

In Tasmania, there was no question about records being broken.

At Liawenee, in the island state's central highlands, the mercury fell to minus 12.1 degrees Celsius this morning, the coldest July day temperature since records began in the area.

The previous coldest day was minus 11.2 degrees Celsius, recorded on 23 July 2011.

Back in the Territory, wet weather has forced the closure of roads across Central Australia.

The communities of Santa Teresa and Finke have been cut off.

Roads linking the community of Kintore near the border of the Territory and Western Australia have also been closed.

The top temperature in Alice Springs today was 13 degrees Celsius.

Rain is expected to ease tomorrow.


© ABC 2013

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