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North Queensland warned to heed cyclone outlook

By Hayley Turner, Tuesday October 16, 2012 - 09:52 EDT

The weather bureau has issued its seasonal outlook and is predicting four tropical cyclones to form off the Queensland coast this summer.

It has described the predicted cyclone activity for this wet season as average.

However, bureau regional director Rob Webb says residents should not become complacent.

"Cyclone Yasi formed in a very strong La Nina year and we saw very widespread flooding across Queensland and a couple of strong cyclones across the coast in Yasi and Anthony in that year," he said.

"This year isn't as strong as that in terms of La Nina, so we don't really expect the same widespread flooding.

"But even in the strongest drought year, parts of Queensland still get floods and cyclones."

Mr Webb says residents should still begin preparations.

"We don't want the message to be given that we don't think that there's a chance of a large cyclone forming," he said.

"That is certainly there this year and even in conditions such as these in the past, we have seen big cyclones affect the coast.

"The potential for cyclones really does start to ramp up through later in November and into December."


- ABC

© ABC 2012

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