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More floods push tour operators 'to the edge'

Wednesday January 30, 2013 - 14:24 EDT

Queensland's tourism sector is counting the cost of the flood disaster.

The Queensland Tourism Industry Council says Bundaberg businesses will feel the greatest impact, along with those on the Sunshine and Gold coasts.

The council says many bookings have been cancelled and roads have been cut, disrupting visitors' travel plans.

CEO Daniel Gschwind says the industry is hoping the damage bill will not be as great as it was after the floods two years ago.

"The long Australia Day weekend is always a good time for tourism and clearly that didn't happen this time around," he said.

"Many bookings have been cancelled and that is not just to the flood affected areas but to the rest of Queensland as well.

"Travel for many visitors has been disrupted and that immediately leads to economic loss.

"How big that economic loss is, we don't know."

Mr Gschwind says some business are preparing to rebuild for the second time in two years.

"Many of them did struggle through the events of 2011, put a lot of effort into rebuilding since then and some of them, those of them who have been affected again, now would certainly be pushed very much to the edge and would be disheartened if nothing else and that's sometimes very difficult to recover from," he said.


© ABC 2013

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