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Man gives terrifying account of tornado escape

Wednesday March 27, 2013 - 09:45 EDT
ABC image
Mr Hodson says his ute became airborne during the tornado. - ABC

A man has described how his car became airborne during a tornado last week in north-eastern Victoria and southern New South Wales.

More than 20 people were injured and 50 homes were damaged when the tornado, with winds of up to 250 kilometres an hour, swept along the Murray River from Tocumwal to Rutherglen and Mulwala.

Gavin Hodgson manages a farm between Barooga and Mulwala.

When the storm hit he was driving his utility on his property near the house.

Mr Hodgson says he feared for his life as the tornado hit the house and a shed and headed for him.

"(I) put my head down on the passenger side under the glove box put my feet in the driver side door held onto the gear stick and we went for a wild ride and it was just unbelievable," he said.

"It wasn't scary but I remember thinking I'm going to die and something is going to hit me hard and knock me out or something but it didn't.

"Then the next thing there was a massive big thump and I hit the power pole and then slid down the power pole."


- ABC

© ABC 2013

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