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Fire bans issued in parts of two southern states

Ben Domensino, Wednesday February 7, 2018 - 14:45 EDT

Rising temperatures have prompted total fire bans in parts of South Australia and Victoria.

High temperatures are only one part of the mix when it comes to fire danger, with wind speed, relative humidity and vegetation dryness also having a significant influence on ratings.

While temperatures are reaching the high thirties to low forties in a large area of southern Australia this week, fairly benign wind speeds are helping keep fire danger ratings down in many areas.

Amid today's hot weather, total fire bans are in place for only the Mount Lofty Ranges and Kangaroo Island in South Australia. Tomorrow, the are under fire ban will grow slightly, comprising of all districts surrounding, but not including, Adelaide in South Australia and the Mallee District in Victoria.

Fortunately, the current spell of hot weather alone is not enough to push fire danger ratings as high as they can get during heat of this intensity.

According to Andrew Watkins from the Bureau of Meteorology, February 7th is statistically Melbourne's hottest day of the year. The city is certainly living up to this reputation today, with the temperature exceeding 32 degrees by midday.

Adelaide residents have outdone Melbornians though, with the mercury reaching 40 degrees early this afternoon.

- Weatherzone

© Weatherzone 2018

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