Fairfax Media Network

Weather News

Extreme heat warning

Tuesday January 8, 2013 - 05:08 EDT

The New South Wales south east is expected to swelter through extreme heat today.

The Bureau of Meteorology is predicting temperatures to reach 43 degrees in the Eurobodalla, while the far south coast, Monaro and high country are expected to reach the mid-30s.

Forecaster, Bec Kamitakahara says there will also be strong winds blowing across the region.

She says the weather could trigger devastating bushfires.

"For some parts of the region, it's going to be an absolute scorcher, particularly along the northern parts of the south coast,� Ms Kamitakahara said.

“Batemans Bay for example is going for 43 degrees.

“That 43 is a constant right along the coast, all the way up to Sydney.

“Further south, the temperatures will be a more moderate 35 and 30 at Bega and Merimbula," she said.

Ms Kamitakahara says people need to be prepared.

"It will be extremely windy and with that high temperature and those stronger winds that is creating extremely dangerous fire conditions.

“The south and the east of New South Wales will see widespread severe fire danger with the potential for some districts to reach extreme."


- ABC

© ABC 2013

More breaking news

Sydney Morning Herald
ABC News
National Nine News
News Limited

Display Your Local Weather

Weather News

Sydney lost as fog, smoke from hazard reduction burns settles over city

09:34 EST

Sydneysiders could have been forgiven for not knowing where they were this morning after the iconic skyline was shrouded in thick smoke and fog.

Myer Hobart store beats flood and fire, but market conditions may be toughest foe

17:03 EST

It has risen again from the ashes and has emerged from a devastating flood — but the challenge for the latest incarnation of Myer's Hobart store is simply to get people to shop there.

Perth rainfall is higher than Melbourne, Hobart, London despite reputation for sunny beaches

14:41 EST

Perth may be best known for its idyllic beaches and sunny skies, but the West Australian capital sees more rain than Melbourne, Hobart and London — cities often associated with gloomy, wet weather.