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Emu Crossing finally gets go-ahead

By Kerrin Thomas, Friday May 17, 2013 - 23:46 EST

The NSW Roads Minister, Duncan Gay, has announced $3.5-million for construction of a new bridge over the Gwydir River.

He made the announcement during a visit to Uralla.

The current crossing, on the Thunderbolts Way, is about 90 years old and is made of a mixture of concrete and rubble.

Secretary of the Emu Crossing Committee, Melissa Lowell, says the Committee thought it would have to wait a lot longer for the funding.

"We heard a couple of days ago that there was going to be a big announcement," she said.

"Council had put the bridge into its Works program for 2015/16, which was a step forward for us, but we were just wondering what our next move would be to progress it further and get the Bridge here for the Bundarra community."

The Committee understands construction work will start in the second half of this year.

Melissa Lowell says it's also an important safety upgrade.

"It's not just the flooding issue, it's the fact that it's a single-lane bridge and not designed to have the amount of traffic that's going over it," she said.

"So, I think there's also safety concerns for people because they say about 580 vehicles a day are using the bridge and that will only continue to grow if the road is opened up as a freight and transport route."


- ABC

© ABC 2013

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