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Damp day in NSW

Mellissa Mackellar, Friday November 16, 2012 - 15:01 EDT

Most of New South Wales is having a damp day after rain fell in every district on Thursday and a further soaking is on the way for many parts.

A low pressure trough crossing the nation's southeast reached NSW on Thursday afternoon, generating widespread showers as well as thunderstorms in the west.

The highest totals were in the Central Tablelands and Southwest Slopes and Plains. Orange picked up 7mm, while Condobolin and Parkes airports gained 6mm each.

Meanwhile, the trough put on an impressive light show for the state's far west. Between midnight and 5am nearly 800 lightning strikes were recorded within 200km of Broken Hill, although the storms only delivered a light sprinkling of less than 1mm.

During Friday much of the rain has been focussed on the Hunter Valley and Central Tablelands. By 1:30pm Mudgee and Nullo Mountain had 13mm in the gauge, while Lake Macquarie had picked up 10mm.

Showers are expected to continue over central and southern NSW on Friday afternoon before easing during the evening.

As the trough continues to cross the state the wet weather will spread further to the north on Saturday, with a risk of thunderstorm development. Any storms that do develop bring a risk of flashing flooding and damaging winds.

- Weatherzone

© Weatherzone 2012

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