Fairfax Media Network

Weather News

Cyclone Ula intensifies to category three as it wends through the South Pacific towards Vanuatu

Saturday January 9, 2016 - 10:23 EDT
ABC image
Tropical Cyclone Ula strengthens as it heads towards Vanuatu - ABC

Severe Tropical Cylcone Ula has returned to category three strength, bringing winds of up to 120 kilometres per hour as it tracks slowly west south-westerly away from Fiji towards Vanuatu.

The first cyclone of 2016 had weakened to a category one after , as a category three system last Saturday.



It caused damage to crops and homes but no casualties, which authorities attributed to early evacuation of vulnerable areas.

Ula passed through, causing minor damage.

Early this morning, the slow-moving system was 480 kilometres east north-east of Tanna, one of Vanuatu's islands hardest hit by the massive Cyclone Pam last March.

Tanna, like much of as a result of the current El Nino phenomenon.

Meanwhile, an out of season cyclone has formed between Kiribati and Marshall Islands, in the northern hemisphere.

Cyclone Pali is the earliest ever recorded in the central Pacific Ocean.

It is currently about 1,300 kilometres south of Hawaii.

The Pacific Disaster Centre said while warm ocean temperatures could lead to intensification, wind shear in the area would likely produce weakening.


- ABC

© ABC 2016

More breaking news

ABC News
Sydney Morning Herald
National Nine News
News Limited

Display Your Local Weather

Weather News

Flood-damaged key rail line weeks away from repair

06:26 EST

It could be another month before a key Tasmanian rail service, the Western Line, can be re-opened after flood damage.

As much of Australia chills, Darwin sweats

18:00 EST

The cold fronts that have frozen southeastern Australia haven't had the gas to push far enough north to cool Darwin, with heat records for the NT capital.

Tips to stay warm in winter: Feeling cold is all about perception, health scientist says

13:26 EST

As residents in New South Wales emerge from under the rug after their , the question on the blue lips of many is what's the best way to stay warm? While many may feel their insides are rapidly chilling, Dr Ollie Jay from the University of Sydney said little was happening to our bodies internally and the cold was all due to "perception".